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Chavezshutter

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Nice one! You do any flying before? Also if you have never used those type of batteries I highly recommend researching them and getting familiar with how to use them safely, charging specifically can be dangerous, handle them with care
 
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Jack

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Nice one! You do any flying before? Also if you have never used those type of batteries I highly recommend researching them and getting familiar with how to use them safely, charging specifically can be dangerous, handle them with care
Never in my life, I did fly last day, a bit funny. Still trying to get used to it.

What do you mean it could be dangerous? And how to charge them? Obviously when they dead.
 
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Chavezshutter

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Never in my life, I did fly last day, a bit funny. Still trying to get used to it.

What do you mean it could be dangerous? And how to charge them? Obviously when they dead.
When I teach people how to fly the first thing I do is to put the fear into them about those batteries for a good reason. They are no joke and people can get hurt in fires caused by them. There is a number of rules you should follow. First - never pierce a battery, at the very least you will get toxic fumes and if the battery is charged expect flames to come out- a lot of flames. Second - never, ever leave a charging battery unattended and charge it where there are no flammables around (bathtub or shower is great), people have lost their homes or lives leaving a battery to charge overnight or leaving it to charge while they are away.

Batteries will deteriorate over time and your flight time will be reduced as a consequence, there are guidelines you can use to keep them in good shape for longer lifespan. The main ones here are do not leave a battery fully charged for anything longer than a day or two and the other is avoid overdraining the battery ( these type of batteries are not meant to be used until they are completely flat )

A good thing for you DJI puts in a lot of electronics and smarts around their batteries to prevent a lot of these issues but do not get complacent and do take my advice on the charging at least, do it when youre there and do it away from flammables. My friend had a charger continue to feed power into a fully charged battery, he has a DJI Phantom, the battery he had was faulty and had he not been there he would have had a good bonfire.

eliasfta eliasfta used to make a flying contraption almost weekly and once he made basically a very fast but crude flying wing, thing got to about 200kph, as he was blasting over some trees he clipped a branch and it basically sheared the top of the battery right off and crashed into the ground, started smoking, by the time we reached it there was over a foot of flames pouring from the battery and for the real kicker, those batteries are less than half the capacity and less cells (overall voltage) than what you have on this DJI.

Sorry for the long post but I always take the time to advice people about these batts, they are serious business
 
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Jack

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When I teach people how to fly the first thing I do is to put the fear into them about those batteries for a good reason. They are no joke and people can get hurt in fires caused by them. There is a number of rules you should follow. First - never pierce a battery, at the very least you will get toxic fumes and if the battery is charged expect flames to come out- a lot of flames. Second - never, ever leave a charging battery unattended and charge it where there are no flammables around (bathtub or shower is great), people have lost their homes or lives leaving a battery to charge overnight or leaving it to charge while
I never leave any battery to charge overnight, to avoid any fires. Even for my cameras m50 and 7dm2, better to prevent than sorry. I did charged them all 3 in one go. Did a test on Thursday, and it does drain very quick. I charged them in my room, luckily nothing happened, but I guess it won't happen anything as long as I maintain eye contact.



Batteries will deteriorate over time and your flight time will be reduced as a consequence, there guidelines you can use to keep them in good shape for longer lifespan. The main ones here are do not leave a battery fully charged for anything longer than a day or two and the other is avoid overdraining the battery ( these type of batteries are not meant
That's a bit confusing here, I just checked the dji manual about batteries and it does say it will discharge automatically, so my question here is, should I charge them? They also advice to fully charge them once every 3 months to maintain the battery life.

I don't think I'll fly that often, taking in consideration that I live in London and there's a lot of restrictions around here, and still had to apply for operator and flyer Id which is a legal requirement.


A good thing for you DJI puts in a lot of electronics and smarts around their batteries to prevent a lot of these issues but do not get complacent and do take my advice on the charging at least, do it when youre there and do it away from flammables. My friend had a charger continue to feed power into a fully charged battery, he has a DJI Phantom, the battery he had was faulty and had he not been there he would have had a good bonfire.
It says they are smart batteries, but obviously good to prevent any accidents or incidents with them. I didn't knew that these batteries could be so dangerous untill you mentioned this morning.


Sorry for the long post but I always take the time to advice people about these batts, they are serious business
Totally fine, don't mind at all to read a proper advice.
 
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Chavezshutter

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Yes your batteries should discharge automatically after a certain period of time, that is because fully charged batteries will deteriorate, shortening the life of the battery if they are not used so the circuitry and smarts of the battery take care of this. You want to charge them when you need them but try to use them as soon as possible after charge. Once again your batteries will discharge automatically but you want to be as "nice" as possible to your batteries to be safe and to get longer use out of them.

This is a vid I show people regarding these batteries:

Lipo safety
 
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Jack

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Yes your batteries should discharge automatically after a certain period of time, that is because fully charged batteries will deteriorate, shortening the life of the battery if they are not used so the circuitry and smarts of the battery take care of this. You want to charge them when you need them but try to use them as soon as possible after charge. Once again your batteries will discharge automatically but you want to be as "nice" as possible to your batteries to be safe and to get longer use out of them.

This is a vid I show people regarding these batteries:

Lipo safety

So what's the best practice to do, to charge them all, or just one depending on my needs?
 
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Jack

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lucky you, where I live, drones are forbidden to use.

Here in London are only certain places where I can fly the drone. And I had to get a license for that as well.
 
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Chavezshutter

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So what's the best practice to do, to charge them all, or just one depending on my needs?
Charge as many as you need but use them once charged, its not a huge deal if now and then you leave one charged but do not rely on the auto discharge function too much. The smarts and circuits we talked about are not fool proof and if they fail for whatever reason (a good one is that the circuits are on a flying machine and these can take some hard knocks) then it wont cause a fire but it will shorten the battery life, a common failure of a battery is a single cell in a battery dies and from there the battery is finished. Think of these batteries as a rubber band which is fully stretched at max capacity, it should not stay in that state for too long. At the same time they also should never be fully flat, 3.8 volts per cell is what we call storeage capacity, max volt per cell is 4.2 volts, if you keep draining the cell to below 3.2 volts per cell or so and it wont last long. You dont need to worry too much about these numbers as long as your batteries work right but its good info to know.
 
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